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A New Commission for Staffing Medical Offices

Stefan-Lucian Deleanu

A New Commission for Staffing Medical Offices

One of the most significant developments in the Official Monitor is the establishment of a commission responsible for contracting family doctors to provide medical services in Romania. Comprised of five legal members, the commission includes representatives from health insurance companies, public health directorates, and medical directorates.

The commission's primary responsibilities involve determining the need for family doctors, analyzing staffing situations, and deciding on the conclusion of contracts with the health insurance company. They must meet annually to prepare the contracting process and evaluate factual situations related to their attributions. Importantly, the commission's decisions are signed by its president and made public on the institutions' websites they represent.

Staffing Criteria for Medical Offices and Specialized Outpatient Clinics

The Ministry of Health in Romania has issued an order amending the criteria for staffing medical offices and working points of medical offices in primary healthcare and specialized outpatient clinics. The updated criteria now include:

  • The conditions under which medical assistance is provided
  • The distance between the medical office and the closest emergency reception structure
  • The number of insured persons registered on the lists of family doctors in administrative-territorial units

Moreover, the order establishes criteria for analyzing situations in which a doctor can provide hospital medical services within two or three distinct sanitary units in a contractual relationship with the health insurance company.

Criteria for Medical Assistance, Medicines, and Medical Devices

The Romanian Official Monitor has published criteria for the provision of medical assistance, medicines, and medical devices within the social health insurance system. These criteria establish the optimal and minimum number of insured persons registered on the lists of family doctors for both urban and rural environments. The commission may consider other criteria related to specific conditions.

Furthermore, the criteria outline the necessary number of doctors of specialty for each clinical specialty and ambulatory palliative care for the county/municipality of Bucharest, in both urban and rural environments. The commission established at the level of the Insurance House by Health of Defence, Public Order, National Security, and Judicial Authority adapts the criteria provided depending on the specifics of the activity in the health network of the ministries and institutions in the field of defense, public order, national security, and judicial authority.

Increasing Points per Capita for Medical Offices and Work Points

The Ministry of Health in Romania has issued an order approving criteria for increasing the number of points per capita for medical offices and work points. The increase percentage is calculated proportionally to the score obtained by the medical office for the conditions in which the activity is carried out.

The order also establishes a list of medical offices to which the increases apply and the specific increase percentage set annually. The criteria are applied separately at the level of medical offices and their work points. This order has been published in the Official Gazette of Romania, Part I.

Implications for Medical Professionals and Patients

These legislative changes carry several implications for medical professionals and patients in Romania. For medical professionals, the updated staffing criteria could lead to more equitable distribution of healthcare providers in both urban and rural areas. By considering factors such as the distance between the medical office and the closest emergency reception structure, the new criteria could improve access to emergency care for patients in underserved areas.

Moreover, the criteria for increasing points per capita for medical offices and work points could incentivize healthcare providers to improve the conditions in which they carry out their activities. As a result, patients may benefit from better quality healthcare services.

On the other hand, the new criteria for medical assistance, medicines, and medical devices may raise concerns about the adequacy of resources allocated to certain medical specialties or patient populations. As the commission is allowed to consider other criteria related to specific conditions, there is a risk that certain groups could be prioritized over others, potentially leading to disparities in access to care.

Concluding Thoughts

The recent changes in Romania's healthcare legislation, as outlined in the Official Monitor, represent significant developments in the country's healthcare landscape. The establishment of a commission for contracting family doctors, updated staffing criteria for medical offices, and new criteria for medical assistance, medicines, and medical devices all have the potential to impact the lives of medical professionals and patients in Romania.

While some of these changes may improve access to care and the quality of healthcare services, it is essential for stakeholders to remain vigilant about potential disparities and unintended consequences. As the new legislation takes effect, ongoing monitoring and evaluation will be crucial to ensure that these changes ultimately benefit the Romanian healthcare system and its patients.

We invite our readers to engage in further discussion on this topic. What are your thoughts on the recent changes in Romania's healthcare legislation? Do you believe they will have a positive or negative impact on the country's healthcare system? Share your opinions in the comments section below.